Archive for August 2010

RV Electrical Safety: Part IV – Hot Skin

Aug 25th, 2010 | By
RV Electrical Safety: Part IV – Hot Skin

An RV Hot-Skin condition occurs when the frame and body of the vehicle is no longer at the same voltage potential as the earth around it. This is usually due to an improper power plug connection at a campsite or garage AC outlet. So what follows are two ways to determine if the skin of your RV has been electrified. The first method uses a voltmeter for testing, while the second method uses a non-contact AC tester like electricians use to check for live outlets.



Stage Electrical Safety — Part 1: Volts

Aug 21st, 2010 | By
Stage Electrical Safety — Part 1: Volts

Most musicians really don’t want to learn about electrical engineering, or even how basic electricity works. Everyone, however, should learn how to test for and avoid electric shocks on stage. With that in mind, there are some novel ways to think about and teach basic electricity to the musician and technician.



RV Electrical Safety: Part III – Outlets

Aug 11th, 2010 | By
RV Electrical Safety: Part III – Outlets

Today’s RVs have much greater power requirements than those of even 10 years ago. You’ve got lots of appliances, so that single 20-amp outlet can’t provide enough current. This is when you need to step up to 30- or even 50-amp outlets at the campsite. Let’s see how they’re wired.



Musician Shock Survey in Progress

Aug 10th, 2010 | By
Musician Shock Survey in Progress

We’re running a survey on ProSoundWeb to find out just how many musicians have been shocked by a guitar or mic. Please help us find out how big a problem this is by responding to this 10-second survey.



RV Electrical Safety: Part II – Meters

Aug 4th, 2010 | By
RV Electrical Safety: Part II – Meters

Remember when you were a child and first started to help with baking there were all sorts of measuring devices and abbreviations to take into consideration? There was a Tablespoon (Tbsp), teaspoon (tsp), Ounce (oz.), with 8 oz. in a cup, and so on. And you better not get your tsp and Tbsp mixed up or bad things would happen to your cake. The same types of rules apply when you’re measuring any electrical values. You just need to know how to use a few electrical measuring tools and then you’re ready to test your RV power.