Archive for July 2010

RV Electrical Safety: Part I – Volts

Jul 29th, 2010 | By
RV Electrical Safety: Part I – Volts

While RV’s as wired from the factory are inherently safe, they can become silent-but-deadly killers if plugged into an improperly wired extension cord or campsite outlet. This is because RV’s are basically a big cage of metal insulated from the ground by rubber tires. It’s up to you, the RVer, to make sure the frame and body of your RV is never electrified due to poor maintenance, bad connections, or reversed polarity in a power plug. This so called Hot-Skin problem is what causes a tingle when you touch the doorknob or metal steps of your RV while standing on the ground.



No~Shock~Zone Clinics Started

Jul 25th, 2010 | By
No~Shock~Zone Clinics Started

We’ve just completed our first six NSZ clinics for musicians across the country. These 90-minute classes feature audio and electrical expert Mike Sokol as the instructor, and teach musicians and audio techs how to stop hums, buzzes and shocks on stage.



Shock the Monkey

Jul 22nd, 2010 | By
Shock the Monkey

By now many of you have seen the CSI episode a few months ago titled “Unshockable”. This show featured the band Rascal Flatts, and had their bass player “electrocuted” onstage when he touched his mic. Now, I normally don’t watch CSI, but I emailed all my electrical engineering buddies to watch the show.



The Shocking Truth About RVs

Jul 22nd, 2010 | By
The Shocking Truth About RVs

We’ve been trying to locate a study on just how many RV owners have been shocked by their recreational vehicles, but search as we might, nobody seems to have done a study. So last July we asked www.RVtravel.com to run a simple 10-second survey directed to their 85,000 opted-in newsletter readers, and this is what we found.



The No~Shock~Zone ™

Jul 22nd, 2010 | By
The No~Shock~Zone ™

It started with a simple shock. I tried to stop a lawnmower engine when I was 10 years old by pulling off the spark plug wire with my bare hands. Now, more than four decades later I can still remember feeling like a big hand slammed me to the ground. That was my first lesson about the force of electricity and what it feels like to be shocked.